In ExPhysiology, Reference

January 01, 2003

PDF Article

Muted hip function (or MHF) is a postural error and a costly biomechanical fault found to some degree in all but the most accomplished athletes, writes Coach Greg Glassman.

Hip dysfunction creates postures and mechanics that reduce power and stability and are generally unsound. The faulty mechanics arise from inadequate training and insufficient practice of critical hip movements. The most important effect is a marked decrease in stability, balance and power.

The degree of MHP varies from mild to severe. In severe cases everything the athlete attempts is rocked by instability and low power. In mild cases power loss and instability occur only while under great physical stress. In combat and elite performance, even mild MHF can lose the day.

Deliberate and focused training and practice of demanding hip extension movements is the only way to eliminate the effects of MHF. No exercise offers as much opportunity to correct MHF tendencies as perfect-form, high-rep push press. MHF is evident within the first .01 of a second of a bad push press.

We tell our best athletes that it will typically take three to five years to fully develop the hip’s explosive capacity to the point where there are no sign of MHF postures or tendencies.

Free Download

Comment

3 Comments on “A Postural Error: A Costly Biomechanical Fault: Muted Hip Function (MHF)”

1

wrote …

Does anyone has a video showing MHF ? Thanks

2

wrote …

Would be great to see more real life pics or proper skeleton models.
A great service would be one which people could send in there home videos of them squatting or whatever, then have a professional instructor correspond and critique there technique for maybe a small fee... This is important stuff and thers not many or even close crossfit gyms where i live (Western Australia)

3

replied to comment from Jacob Law

Hi Jacob - check out mobility WOD.com they have some good videos on posture for deadlift - ring dips - etc it is amazing how keeping head from chicken necking during pull ups and such, makes elements easier and protects your spinal column. Also, I have gotten lots of great advice from my chiropractor on posture plus he is one of my crossfit coaches - so I recommend a good chiro that understands/does crossfit.

Leave a comment

Comments (You may use HTML tags for style)