How to Pick Up Women

By Josh Bunch

In Affiliation, Coaching

March 06, 2009

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Josh Bunch offers several strategies on how to pick up women clients at your affiliate.

Ever heard of the phrase “perception is reality”? I vigorously disagree. Just because I perceive black as white, for example, doesn’t make me right; it just makes me ignorant or colorblind. A similar illusion is often at play when it comes to women and fitness training. If your perception leads you to believe women are the weaker sex, you’re not only missing reality, you’re probably not a CrossFitter (and if you’re a guy, you’re probably single).

In my little CrossFit world, women are the majority vote. I own Practice CrossFit in Troy, Ohio, which currently has a membership ratio of 80% women to 20% men. While I would like to believe it’s because I am such a stunning specimen of human perfection and font of knowledge that women clamor to be trained by me, a pretty face only goes so far. The females I have the pleasure of working with every day come here because they get results.

Josh offers five rules for “How to Turn Women On:”
1. Set high expectations for them
2. Feed their tendency to “Do it for the team”
3. Be honest (in the gym)
4. Don’t try to teach attitude
5. Ignore the media and the misconceptions

In short, if you’re an affiliate wanting or needing more female attendance, consider whether or not you’re creating the kind of reality at your box that attracts women waiting to unleash the sleeping lion within them; a reality that says, “Yeah, this is tough but you’re ready for it.” If you feel you’ve already been doing this and yet still have poor female attendance, try cleaning your showers and vacuuming your floors every now and again.

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14 Comments on “How to Pick Up Women”

1

wrote …

Hi Josh. Thank you for appreciating the women in your gym - but, frankly, I like going to a gym that FINALLY has men in it. Taking classes with men as equals is a great experience. In a Globo gym, more often than not, you find that there are men working on the weights and the machines, and women are in the classes - but for an occasional Spinning class - never the twain shall meet. I love Crossfit because we're all together. I like to look around and see 50/50. And EVERYONE is working hard. And we're called ATHLETES not members! The owner and trainers at Crossfit Milford make a special effort at creating a great community, and it seems you do as well.
Hilary
Athlete at Crossfit Milford in Milford, CT

2

Ned Ferguson wrote …

I thought the article was going to be about the Turkish get up. :)

3

wrote …

I think your article was great! I think its important to have a good amount of men and women in the gym. I notice when i work out with females I have a tendency to not push myself because they are usually weaker and I know I'll still beat them even if I don't try that hard. Its like you said- they are always seeing on TV what they are supposed to be and it is definitely not strong-being strong is like a curse! When i work out with guys its like the level is taken up a notch or two. I also thought what you said about being fair to both was excellent. I hate hate hate when a guy sees me doing something messed up or weak and gives me that " oh, how cute" look and then tells me I did a "Great Job[insert stupid face]. He's lost all credibility with me thats for sure. Loved your perspective on this issue!
-CS

4

wrote …

I can't even begin to describe the ways in which your article rocks. I have always felt that CrossFit encourages women to embrace their strength and power - it would seem though that you step it up a notch further and expect your female athletes to set aside all their perceived limitations and excel. Thank you for that.

5

wrote …

Thanks Josh. Female CrossFitters are an inspiration for me, pure and simple. As a male who is just getting started I am humbled and awed by the accomplishments of all the elite athletes in our "sport", including the women. It is such a shame that women are not supposed to be strong, much less truly fit, in our society and I like to see CF's opposition to that status quo spelled out. You heard him ladies: get in there and ROCK IT.

6

wrote …

Thanks for the positive response. I wanted to make sure that women get a feel for the respect I believe Male CFers have for them. In most situations when a box strts off predominatly male, there are some women who think that CF would b fun, but that the environment might not fit them, where others have that desire to train with a male because they believe they may be pushed harder. On the flip side when u start out mostly female, I have noticed u have a much harder time attracting males cause they get smoked by a class of girls. Apparently the majority of male egos out their don't lend themselves all to well to getn lite up by the opposite sex. In my experiance the only males who handle this well, are very comfortable, cool ass dudes who just wanna play the game.

Again thanks, The female Cfers who allow me the pleasure of getting to coach them mean the world to me, and I wanted to extend those feelings of admiration to the CF community, who I think we could all stand to give more to, because CrossFit asks so little in return for all it provides.....thanks....jb

7

wrote …

Thanks for the article Josh.
It is very important to ignore the stereotypes of women in the media. As a CrossFit female I take pride in the physical accomplishments that I've made thru CrossFit. My quads won't fit into skinny jeans anymore and all my shirts are tight in the shoulders, but this is a small price to pay for the ability to do pull-ups, handstands, plank push-ups and the lifts and pulls in a CrossFit workout. This has helped change my outlook so when I look at what society calls "beautiful" instead of wishing for that look, I take pride in my abilities and my figure.

What you say about expectations is very important too. Many women never even try certain things because pull-ups, deadlifts, etc. are things "guys" do. The videos of Annie, Nicole, Jolie, et.al continue to inspire me and keep the bar high for what I expect of myself.

Another amazing resource for female CorssFitters that I know I will use at some point is http://crossfitmom.com/
Pregnant women who do CrossFit rock!

8

wrote …

Good stuff. I am a male Crossfitter and former Olympic athlete. I hope to one day be as good at this stuff as the women featured on the main site. They are a source of inspiration every bit as much as Greg A, etc. Also, as my two boys grow up they will watch women (including their mother) doing amazing Crossfit things and as a result have a midset toward women which I hope will enable them to have strong, healthy, supportive relationships with women the rest of their lives. Boys need exposure to Crossfit women as early and as often as possible. And, if I had girls, it would be even more important. Imagine how much easier life would be for women if they focused on how many pull-ups they could do rather than how big their butt was.

9

wrote …

Good stuff. I am a male Crossfitter and former Olympic athlete. I hope to one day be as good at this stuff as the women featured on the main site. They are a source of inspiration every bit as much as Greg A, etc. Also, as my two boys grow up they will watch women (including their mother) doing amazing Crossfit things and as a result have a midset toward women which I hope will enable them to have strong, healthy, supportive relationships with women the rest of their lives. Boys need exposure to Crossfit women as early and as often as possible. And, if I had girls, it would be even more important. Imagine how much easier life would be if women focused on how many pull-ups they could do rather than how big their butt was.

10

wrote …

Good stuff. I am a male Crossfitter and former Olympic athlete. I hope to one day be as good at this stuff as the women featured on the main site. They are a source of inspiration every bit as much as Greg A, etc. Also, as my two boys grow up they will watch women (including their mother) doing amazing Crossfit things and as a result have a midset toward women which I hope will enable them to have strong, healthy, supportive relationships with women the rest of their lives. Boys need exposure to Crossfit women as early and as often as possible. And, if I had girls, it would be even more important. Imagine how much easier life would be if women focused on how many pull-ups they could do rather than how big their butt was.

11

replied to comment from Brad Willock

Brad-I couldnt agree more with your comment. As a mother of twin 11 year old boys and an 9 year old daughter, surrounding them with a healthy lifestyle of proper nutrition(not obsession), proper technigue and a drive to compete, that is what i want to expose my kids to. They may not be stars on the football field but they WILL BE ATHELETES who can compete!!! So much about our society is a misconception, why does the top athelete is schools have to be the star basketball player, what about the kid who can tear up a black diamond on the slopes? Exposure is everything, making it a family decision to be fit and heathly, that is a commitment i am proud of! Brad I wish more fathers thought like you, girls need alot of support not to feel complelled to focus on their butt but on the whole body and soul. Thanks.

12

wrote …

I have the pleasure of training Stacy.......She is a champ, and has this amazing affinity towords proper movement that makes my job much easier. Stacy is the prime example of what I was reffering to about comraderie. Her ositive light that shines when she enters PCF is contagious, and she helps bring out the best in all those around her. Not that dudes don't play this game too, but girls stay focused on the greater good a little more so than males seem to.....jb

13

wrote …

Josh, Have you ever considered developing a little intensity in your personality?

Kidding aside, I look forward to crossing paths with you one day, and keep the CF articles coming. Paul

14

wrote …

I really enjoyed your article. Well thought out and totally true! There was one thing however that left me with a bad taste. At the end ofthe article in the Author BIO he mentions "Many Certifications" "none of them matter unless they have CrossFit attached to it" and the author is not by any means the only one to take this type of stance. CF's are a proud bunch and rightfully so, but the thing that I find MOST attractive educationally about CF is the dense concentration of talent and experience in one spot! Such a rarity to see that which has congregated around this method. It is so refreshing and inspiring! And yes I know that Ripp denounced NSCA and I wouldnt put something like AFAA even in the same universe as CF. BUT they ARE important!!! Their value to the trainer is actually quite immense. They can give perspective and tools to bear on certain clients or situations and a general conceptual understanding of training that will only enhance the knowledge gleened from Coach Glassman. I am confident, that if the Author hadn't had those "other" certifications he would be having a much harder time applying the tools of CF and quite possibly not able to offer the insight that this article so skillfuly provided.

I know we are all proud and loyal to CF but dont lose sight of the forest for the trees. Trainers should embrace every tool that they have ever gained, even the outdated ones. That experience cant be taught or learned in one certification. It cant be faked and it's what makes the difference between a trainer of 1 year and a trainer of 10 years!

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