In Kettlebells, Videos

September 26, 2009

Video Article

In his own special dialect, CrossFit kettlebell expert Jeff Martone takes athletes at a Kettlebell Cert through a top-down progression as they learn the kettlebell thruster. Working through the press, and front squat/push press, Martone explains core-to-extremity movement is critical to success.

The key to the kettlebell thruster is keeping your elbows tight against your body, allowing the momentum created by explosive hip extension to be transferred efficiently to the bells. After the kettlebells start to rise due to hip extension, the pressing phase finishes off the thruster.

At the top, athletes should guard against any rotation of the kettlebell, which adds unnecessary movement to the lift.

Video by Again Faster.

5min 32sec

Additional reading: The Kettlebell Press by Jeff Martone, published Oct. 1, 2007.

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7 Comments on “The Kettlebell Press and Thruster”

1

wrote …

Not so gut instructions for proper kettlebell technique.

2

Erik Preston wrote …

Nice instruction, Jeff. The Kettlebell is a veritable training modality and has a definitive place in CrossFit programming, beyond the swing.

3

Jesse Gray wrote …

Is there a reason why it's better to use kettlebells for thrusters as opposed to dumbbells? I watched the video and it seems great but not much different than using a standard dumbbell.

4

wrote …

I THINK ANY VARIETY, NO MATTER HOW "SLIGHT" CAN BE GOOD FOR YOU AND GOOD FOR YOUR TRAINING.
ESPECIALLY SINCE WE ARE CROSSFITTERS. WE SHOULD DO IT ALL...AND SMILE :)

5

wrote …

Jeff, thanks for the clarification of hand position at the top. I've always had the rotational movement and now I know that I need to stop it.

As for variety--I agree, every little bit of change just broadens the modal domains part of CF.

6

wrote …

Jeff Martone is awesome

7

wrote …

Jesse- I don't know who you were asking, but think of the rotation of the wrist and entire arm during the press( supination/ pronation). It would be a lot harder to rotate the dumbells like that during a press than it would be for kettlebells. Not only that, but Jeff mentions to keeps your elbows in. The reason for this is once you become tired, your hands will want to fall away from your body and placing too much stress on your shoulder complex. You wouldn't be able to hold dumbells as close together at your chest as you can with kettlebells. Hopefully that helps.

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