CrossFit Goes to College

By Dr. Andrew Hatchett

In Basics, Rest Day/Theory

February 08, 2010

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Dr. Andrew Hatchett is asked to teach a weight-training course at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He introduces his students to CrossFit in hopes of producing and new and better breed of fitness professional.

As a faculty member and loyal CrossFitter who teaches in the field of kinesiology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, I was recently presented with an exciting opportunity: adding CrossFit to the university’s curriculum.

It is profoundly important to educate the future leaders of fitness science and the fitness industry in techniques and practices that allow for a change in the status quo. I view CrossFit as the most effective and efficient fitness program on the planet. CrossFit affords the opportunity to eliminate a tremendous amount, if not all, of the mistruths that infest the fitness industry. It’s simply a better way to teach fitness and exercise.

I’m sure a number of other questions can be posed in regard to the adoption of CrossFit as a course at institutions of higher learning, but the bottom line is this: CrossFit is the most effective and efficient method to deliver functional fitness training. In my opinion, the logical evolution is to offer this training to those who will lead and shape the standards of fitness for years to come.

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19 Comments on “CrossFit Goes to College”

1

wrote …

great to see!

College Physiology programs are such a joke right now, this is just the kind of jumpstart a lot of programs could use. Good on ya-

2

wrote …

We would like to do the same at the University of Johannesburg! The same questions were posed as to affiliation of university
programs, standards and procedures of course content,
and development and maintenance of qualification to
instruct such a course. The last thing we want to do is trespass on CrossFit's copyright on information. Thank you for sharing!

3

Thanks for sharing. I just today started a discussion at my college about starting a phys ed course on CrossFit. I have a PhD in neuroscience and am getting L1 cert in two weeks. Currently our students are required to complete 1 credit hour of phys ed and at our small start up college in Georgia all we offer is walking and swimming. The students are aghast to say the least. I mentioned the idea of starting CF for Credit and I've already received several emails encouraging me to go for it: some from Faculty who say they'll audit!

Would you mind emailing me your course outline and proposal, syllabi, etc materials. It looks like you have a great start here.

Cheers,
Steven Platek
(splatek@gmail.com)

4

wrote …

What a great course. I am a high school teacher and wish our school would require CF from every student everyday. A real education in functional movement is so much better then the current PE classes.

5

wrote …

Great article.

I am a teacher at Saratoga High School in Saratoga, CA and we have implemented CrossFit throughout our entire fitness program. All of our fitness teachers are L1 certified. All of our 9th graders (approximately 300 students) are being taught the 9 functional movements. Our after school sports programs, including football, wrestling, basketball, lacrosse, tennis and soccer are moving large loads, long distances, quickly. Students are logging all of their WOD's and reflecting on challenges and improvements made to their overall fitness. As one teacher on our campus put it, "We're experiencing a Fitness Renaissance."


6

wrote …

I guess I'm not the only one with that idea. I will be teaching the Resistance Training course at the University of Manitoba this summer and will use much of a Level 1 cert format. Crossfit is almost unheard of hear so getting the information out with out it sounding like a fad has been difficult.

7

Michael Chase wrote …

The idea of collegiate-level Crossfit Games at the regional level sounds exciting! Same for High School! I hope for sprinting you are teaching the POSE method.

8

wrote …

I am an University of Louisiana at Lafayette alumni and glad to see a Professor at the University implementing Crossfit into the minds of future leaders of the fitness industry. Go Cajuns!

9

wrote …

Please share your syllabus.
Thank you!

10

wrote …

I graduated magna cum laude with a degree in exercise science. Aside from A&P and Kinese I have learned more from this website than in any of my class rooms.

11

wrote …

great article. As a HS and Univ teacher, CF has changed my programs dramatically. We have been doing CF only in my PE classes for over 3 years now. As for the college class, I have implemented CF principles into the traditional NSCA "stuff". CF has allowed me to question conventional wisdom and I try to pass on to my students.

I have been in strength and conditioning for 14 years and have learned more from CF in 4 years than any college class or "professional development" opportunity. More schools need to get on board and change the status "boring".

12

wrote …

As a college graduate of Kinesiology, reading this article was a breath of fresh air

13

replied to comment from Rick Ellis

If any of you had implemented a CrossFit program on the High School level could you share your syllabus and any other pertinent infromation you used to begin the program? I am a High School strength training teacher and football coach. I would love to be able to approach my Physical Education supervisor with some concrete ideas on how to start CrossFit in our schools. He would be very open to a program that would benefit our students.

14

wrote …

This is an awesome article. I am currently working on opening a CrossFit in Auburn, Al and plan to teach CrossFit as a PE for Auburn University starting Spring 2011. I really like the course outline and might "borrow" it from ya. Great to see it has already happened!

15

wrote …

I'm interested in getting my Master's in Exercise Physiology. I am taking my Level 1 cert July 24th. I was looking at the CAL U Penn program (which is online), and suggestions?

16

wrote …

Hey, i just wanted to drop by and say that i WILL NOT be opening a CrossFit in Auburn at this time, I was unable to secure and financial backing. But if another opportunity arises I will try again.

17

wrote …

Love the article!!! As a former Sports Med major, I felt that having something like a weight-training course standardized with logical reasoning was something that was sorely needed! Too often people view something like Kinesiology as a fancy word for teaching people how to blow a whistle and tell kids to run laps. One of my Professors in University taught a course on Golf that had a 14 page final exam. He knew what the public perception was of Kinesiology and Exercise Science and was determined to reverse that train of thought. Thank you for continuing that work by turning something that would’ve been an “easy A” into something that challenged your students and forced them to put some thought behind the movements that they were performing!

18

wrote …

Love the article!!! As a former Sports Med major, I felt that having something like a weight-training course standardized with logical reasoning was something that was sorely needed! Too often people view something like Kinesiology as a fancy word for teaching people how to blow a whistle and tell kids to run laps. One of my Professors in University taught a course on Golf that had a 14 page final exam. He knew what the public perception was of Kinesiology and Exercise Science and was determined to reverse that train of thought. Thank you for continuing that work by turning something that would’ve been an “easy A” into something that challenged your students and forced them to put some thought behind the movements that they were performing!

19

wrote …

I am thinking of offering crossFit training to our local junior college located here in Selma Al. How should I initiate this process? I have my L1 certificate and own box. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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