Video Article

Join CrossFit Endurance coach John McBrien as he discusses programming for multiple-sport athletes, such as those who run, bike and swim or who are military athletes.

A week of CrossFit Endurance programming for multi-sport athletes differs from the single-sport supplement of two or three endurance workouts in addition to the four-to-six days of CrossFit programming. Multi-sport programming allows only four CrossFit workouts per week and supplements them with two sport-specific workouts per sport per week. Multi-sport programming also adds one-to-two stamina workouts (time trials or tempos) per week, rotating the sport each week. Just as with single-sport programming, progression and recovery are key.

“You get your recovery in the form of what you have between workouts and what you have between days,” McBrien says.

McBrien also discusses multi-sport bias training for athletes who need to focus on one sport more than the others. He says CrossFit trumps traditional “brick” training used to develop stamina.

“What mimics multi-modality movements more than anything else? CrossFit. So you really don’t need the amount of brick training you would necessarily under traditional approach. Why? Because you’re going to get it from CrossFit,” he says.

9min 26sec

Additional reading: A Theoretical Template for CrossFit Endurance Programming by John McBrien, published Sept. 15, 2010.

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5 Comments on “CrossFit Endurance: Multi-Sport Programming”

1

wrote …

Great summary. I have used a similar approach while training for XTERRA off-road triathlons. MY CF workouts definitely replace the brick training I did in the past.

2

wrote …

Left cycling a while ago due to time/family constraints. Found CrossFit to get fit again. Can't wait to give CFE a try in the near future.

Great stuff.

3

Joseph Alexander wrote …

Great job guys...this will be a valuable reference video for the L1 participants looking for endurance programming information. Please keep these coming!

4

wrote …

Question: What times should I aim for as a percentage of my PR or first interval when doing interval training? Furthermore should all interval training incorporate a tabata-like work to rest ratio i.e. 2:1? When I do 400m repeats on the track I shoot for my slowest rep to be no more then 15 seconds slower then my fastest, using a 1:1 work to rest ratio. I was thinking that there might be a chart with this iformation, kinda like a strength chart with percentages of everything built off a 1RM or PR in this case, but no such luck in finding that. Can some one shine a light on this?

5

replied to comment from Kevin Seaman

I have a similar question. Kevin did you get an answer for that? I am new to the crossfit journal and don't see any responses to your question.

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