In Olympic Lifts, Videos

September 29, 2011

Video Article

Two-time Olympian and coach Chad Vaughn and fellow Olympian and American record holder Kendrick Farris recently held an invitational training session. Vaughn explains that he handpicked the athletes from ones he had worked with in the past.

“We want them to be inside of a high-level training environment, weightlifting training environment, that otherwise they may not be exposed to,” he says.

The purpose is not only to teach the athletes, but also to allow them to watch and learn from Vaughn and Farris as training partners.

Vaughn says today’s focus for the athletes is “simplification of your focus.”

“I just want you to be as tight as you possibly can from the floor and then aggressive—that’s how you’re gonna lift the most weight today,” he says.

Vaughn and Farris have different styles to share, but according to Vaughn, “In the beginning we want to teach you positions that are going to allow you to use the part of your body that you need to use.”

The two coaches work with the athletes and share cues and technique advice to help develop the snatch.

10min 43sec

Video by Again Faster.

Additional reading: Burg’s Eye View No. 1 by Mike Burgener, published Nov. 3, 2010.

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7 Comments on “The 2011 Chad Vaughn and Kendrick Farris Training Invitational”

1

wrote …

Man I wish I could O-lift like that...

2

wrote …

Great video. Thanks.

3

wrote …

Thanks for the video, it's great to watch them lift!

4

wrote …

What a great opportunity.

5

wrote …

Keep these oly videos comming. Great video

6

wrote …

great video! I'd be interested to know what type of flexibility/mobility Kendrick and Chad focus on to get into that deep squat that gives them the "bounce" out of the bottom. I find it hard to get into that position but I see other people that can get their effortlessly. Is this common that some people can just get to that position and others can't or is it fixable with mobility work?

7

replied to comment from Brian Hassler

Mobility work can fix poor squat mechanics and help maintain a solid back in the bounce.

To get in that deep position, work on ankle and soleus mobility. Remember that the bounce is not a relaxation of the hips and back, but more of a stretch reflex of hitting the bottom position quickly. Working on hip mobility will help with keeping the lumbar curve in the bounce.

Donny Shankle does a better job of explaining the stretch reflex and lumbar curve in the squat here

http://donnyshankle.blogspot.com/2011/10/on-weightlifting-personal-view_20.html (WFS)

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