The Kitchen WOD

By Nick Massie

In Nutrition

November 02, 2011

PDF Article

Mise en Place: CrossFitting chef Nick Massie on how to make cooking fast and enjoyable.

Food—we all eat it, and most of us enjoy it. Some look to it for comfort, while others see it strictly as fuel.

However you view food, there is one resounding truth: it can be a daunting task to learn to prepare it well. From planning a weekly menu to shopping, storing, cooking and cleaning up afterward, a lot goes into food preparation.

The following are some valuable lessons I’ve learned in the kitchen over the past 15 years. I hope that sharing them with you will provide a better understanding of how to approach cooking, and that you will learn to enjoy planning your weekly menu.

And maybe you’ll see how similar cooking can be to CrossFit.

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3 Comments on “The Kitchen WOD”

1

wrote …

Great article, I love to cook and I love to eat so it's a constant battle between cooking something healthy and cooking something awesome i.e. salmon vs. cheesecake.

I also follow this simple rule "buy it nice or buy it twice". It's simple, cheap things are cheap for a reason and I don't have a lot of money. So I save and buy the quality item so I won't be buying it again in a few months. In the long run you save money by simply waiting a little longer and buying the better option.

2

wrote …

Nick, I'm really glad to see you back in the Journal! It seems like a long time since your last video was posted along with your request for ideas for future topics -- I was one of the many, many people who loved your work and wanted to see more.


I completely agree that "cheap is expensive" -- I remember spending about $100 almost 20 years ago (it was a lot more money back then!) for my Wusthof which is still the only knife I really use regularly. A good knife, a Le Creuset dutch oven, and an All-Clad saute pan can do about 95% of everything most of us will ever need to do in the kitchen, do it well, and never wear out. A bit more expensive up front, but better in every possible way than cheaper alternatives.

3

wrote …

I limit my cooking time for most meals to 30 minutes and - provided I've remembered to take my protein out to defrost the night before - I can cook most anything on the menu in that time. We play Iron Chef at my house. I might come home to a "Secret Ingredient" waiting along with a request for a particular dish in a given amount of time. It makes it fun and is good practice in kitchen management.

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