Accommodating Resistance

By Shane Sweatt and Laura Phelps-Sweatt

In Powerlifting, Reference, Videos

March 25, 2012

Video Article

It’s impossible not to have bar deceleration if you don’t have “accommodating resistance,” says Shane Sweatt of Westside Barbell.

“If you have bar deceleration, you’re teaching yourself to slow down. … In sports, that is not optimal,” he says.

As you move a barbell, it’s natural to reduce your effort as you get to positions of mechanical advantage; e.g., the top of a bench-press rep. Enter accommodating resistance that incorporates the use of bands or chains on the barbell. By making certain parts of the rep more challenging, you’re teaching your body to exert maximal force throughout the rep.

“We want this to affect your central nervous system. We want your central nervous system to optimally fire through all range of the motion,” says Sweatt, who is accompanied by elite powerlifter Laura Phelps-Sweatt.

“We want (athletes) to accelerate all the way through the range of motion,” Sweatt says.

5min 45sec

Additional reading: CrossFit Strength Training by Louie Simmons, published Feb. 1, 2011.

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2 Comments on “Accommodating Resistance”

1

wrote …

I wanna see video of this 300lb kid box jumping from seated with a weight vest and ankle weights to a 60+ inch box!

2

wrote …

I'm looking forward to the Fall cert in Oahu!

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