CrossFit: The Good Fight

By Heber Cannon, Jay Vera and Eric Maciel

In CrossFit, HD Videos, Rest Day/Theory

March 09, 2015

Video Article

For several years, CrossFit Inc. Founder and CEO Greg Glassman and his legal team have been fighting a battle with the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), organizations that present themselves as the foremost authorities on strength and conditioning.

Through the CrossFit Journal, The Russells blog, social-media posts and litigation, CrossFit is taking action against questionable “science” published by corporate-sponsored researchers, non-existent definitions of fitness, poor exercise instruction, injurious hydration recommendations, and attacks against CrossFit and its affiliates.

CrossFit is currently in litigation with the NSCA over alleged fraud in reporting injury data involving members of CrossFit 614 in Ohio, and CrossFit recently hosted the 2015 CrossFit Conference on Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia to help prevent the needless deaths that occur when athletes fall victim to bad hydration science and drink too much. CrossFit is also actively working against efforts to pass legislation that would require the licensure of fitness trainers.

Overall, CrossFit is working to demonstrate that these organizations are unfit to lead the fitness industry. CrossFit HQ staff member Russell Berger has worked closely with Glassman throughout.

“These battles that we’re fighting are incredibly important and are really a noble cause,” Berger explains.

He adds: “I know there’s this misperception about CrossFit … that we’re a litigious company that’s just out there creating petty squabbles between our competitors, and this is all just us being angry because we’ve been criticized and can’t handle that. It’s a lot more than that.”

Here, Berger gives an overview and a history of the legal battles CrossFit is involved in and explains the final goals. One of those goals is to preserve the livelihoods of trainers at CrossFit affiliates by preventing unfounded criticism that tarnishes the reputations of those gyms.

“You’ll see that what we’re doing is not just incredibly important for our company and for the CrossFit brand,” he says, “but it’s important for every single one of our 11,000 affiliates.”

Video by Heber Cannon, Jay Vera and Eric Maciel.

30min 40 sec

Additional reading: “NCSA ‘CrossFit Study’ Fraud?” by Russell Berger, published May 22, 2013.

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3 Comments on “CrossFit: The Good Fight”

1

wrote …

In my country there is no much of papers or any information about fitness. All we have is the ones, we have in the specialized countries.
Is great to know the true about those studies that confuse people all around the world. Thanks for the explanation.

2

wrote …

Thank you for presenting us this information. I'm still in the military and want to transition from my 8 year career in the military and take the leap into CrossFit and fitness. I dream of nothing more but to own and operate my own facility. To be able to call something mine that I created is what it is to be an American. This country is based on the hard work that its people put into it and being able to have my own gym to me is the largest accomplishment. Now knowing that the NSCA and ACSM want to manipulate and politely ruin some things as simple as fitness is terrifying. It makes chasing that dream that much harder. Believe me that won’t stop me. Being able to have someone I’ve coached thank me because they PR’ed a lift is worth everything. Thank you for fighting this fight for us.

3

wrote …

Does anyone wonder why there are so many people who do not trust science? This situation sounds just like that pushed for decades by the American Heart Association, the USDA, and other organizations informing us about proper nutrition. If you haven't read "Why We Get Fat" by Gary Taubes or "The Big Fat Surprise" by Nina Teicholz you will find an expose' of the fraudulent manipulation of research data about our diets for over 40 years.

Has anyone at Crossfit thought of trying to discuss this issue with the Chronicle of Higher Education? An article there explaining what is happening might open the eyes of many academics.

It would also help if Crossfit would let affiliates, and all who believe in the program, know which states are proposing licensing legislation & the bill names & numbers. Many organizations provide their members with talking points, names & addresses of legislators, and guidelines for speaking with their elected officials. Public comment by Crossfitters to these legislators can go a long way in educating them & changing their understanding of the issue. Because, unfortunately, elected officials are often the least knowledgeable folks about the issues on which they support legislation.

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