ExPhysiology

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Video Article

Strength, as an isolated quality, can be defined and measured as the biological contractile potential of muscle--as how hard your muscles can contract to apply force. But from our perspective, Coach Glassman explains in this lecture excerpt, that is an incomplete definition and an isolated measure that doesn't really reveal much about its application to real-world functionality (just as VO2 max measurements alone tell us little about a person's capacity and… Continue Reading

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Why a 10K WOD?

By Tony Leyland

In ExPhysiology, Reference

December 01, 2007

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I had planned to follow on from my November CrossFit Journal article on spine mechanics for lifters by discussing injury potential due to repetitive loading. In the November article I talked about the dangers of exceeding the shear strength of the spine with poor lifting form. However, injuries often occur in fitness programs due to low-force cyclic loading rather than peak loading. Then, in October, something… Continue Reading

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Spine Mechanics for Lifters

By Tony Leyland

In ExPhysiology, Reference

November 01, 2007

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Anyone who has watched CrossFit instructional videos and read CrossFit Journal articles focusing on lifting technique will know the importance of maintaining a straight torso with normal lumbar curvatures. This month I want to briefly discuss lumbar spinal anatomy and mechanics.

I believe that being able to express mechanical concepts (such as different postures during lifting) in numbers provides the strongest possible… Continue Reading

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Specifically Speaking

By Lon Kilgore PhD

In ExPhysiology

October 01, 2007

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Every single kind of exercise researcher and practitioner known to mankind has been indoctrinated with the concept of specificity of training. The idea is so well entrenched in the professional psyche that it even has an acronym, the S.A.I.D. principle--Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand. In a lot of ways, it's pretty correct physiologically. We all remember Dr. Hans Selye and his General Adaptation Syndrome model, which explains how the body… Continue Reading

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In ExPhysiology

October 01, 2007

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Continuing with my theme of muscle mechanics (following my article two months ago on the stretch-shortening cycle), this month I would like to explain the rationale behind the plethora of variable resistance machines and training concepts that are so common. It isn't that designers of exercise machines and fitness programs do not understand muscle mechanics (although some clearly don't), but that knowledge is… Continue Reading

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Human Weapon System

By Robert Smith M.D.

In ExPhysiology, LEO/Mil, Videos

September 01, 2007

Video Article

Robert Smith is an M.D. and the medical director of Direct Action Medical Network, a group of physicians providing medical training and support to organizations that work in high-risk, remote, and/or austere areas. In this video, he talks about the tactical and safety benefits that people working in such environments can gain from understanding the body as a human weapon system. There are significant advantages of training the whole human body… Continue Reading

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Genetic Potential

By Lon Kilgore

In ExPhysiology

August 01, 2007

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I have kids. One, a six year old, Thomas, loves all things martial arts. Since he was four years old, he's been studying with Harley Elmore, a heavily credentialed and amazing instructor in Jeet Kun Do, Sayoc Kali, Muay Thai, and Silat. Why, as a little four-year-old, did he make a decision to study martial arts? I bet you can guess. TV. I'm not sure but I'll wager that there has been a large upturn in the… Continue Reading

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In ExPhysiology, Reference

August 01, 2007

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I recently overhead a new CrossFit trainee mention that the kipping pull-up he was being taught was "kind of cheating." This is a very common response that shows that many people are unaware that functional movements often require contributions of eccentric (lengthening), isometric (static), and concentric (shortening) muscle actions and that one very common power movement uses a stretch immediately prior to the muscle shortening. This pattern is called… Continue Reading

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