In Olympic Lifts

July 30, 2014

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Bill Starr explains that training your biceps has limited carryover to lifting, but targeting your triceps can result in PR snatches and jerks.

Everyone who ever set out to improve his physique and get stronger started out by working his arms.

Not his back or legs. Arms.

Why?

Upper arms are a symbol of manhood, especially for youngsters, and bulging biceps show that a lot of hard work has been done to achieve such results. Sometimes those impressive upper arms came about from doing hard labor, but in most cases they were products of long hours in the gym doing countless curls in a wide variety of ways: one-arm concentration curls with dumbbells, two-arm dumbbell curls, curls on a preacher bench, hammer curls, and curls with a barbell—plus some additional work on an EZ curl bar and a curling machine if one was available.

While the other part of the upper arm, the triceps, did not occupy the same high rank of distraction as the lofty biceps, the three-headed muscle had to be worked diligently as well if the athlete wanted to build large upper arms. That’s because the triceps make up two-thirds of the upper arm, so only hammering away at the biceps without spending ample time doing something specific for the triceps just doesn’t get the job done.

Yet when anyone is asked to show his arm size, he will, 98 times out of a hundred, hit a double biceps pose.

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Building Burgess: Part 4

By Jeremy Podlog and Kyle Kleefeld

Video Article

British Army veteran Mike Burgess dedicated himself to becoming fit. The 42-year-old lives with post-traumatic stress disorder but says he doesn’t let it define who he is. Drawn to CrossFit by its connection to the military, Burgess was intrigued when he saw the results CrossFit produces. In this six-part series, follow the trials and triumphs that go along with “Building Burgess.”

In Part 4, we find Burgess in his home, tired after a restless night of… Continue Reading

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The Full Snatch

By Zachary Long

In Olympic Lifts

July 25, 2014

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A closer look at the mechanics and technique of the fastest lift in the world.

The snatch is simply lifting a barbell from the floor to overhead in one quick motion. However, this basic description barely begins to explain the complexity of the lift. The snatch requires a combination of strength, coordination, explosiveness, mobility and stability that is not seen in any other exercise.

The snatch requires high levels of skill and meticulous… Continue Reading

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Building Burgess: Part 3

By Jeremy Podlog

In CrossFit, HD Videos, Medical/Injuries

July 24, 2014

Video Article

British Army veteran Mike Burgess dedicated himself to becoming fit. The 42-year-old lives with post-traumatic stress disorder but says he doesn’t let it define who he is. Drawn to CrossFit by its connection to the military, Burgess was intrigued when he saw the results CrossFit produces. In this six-part series, follow the trials and triumphs that go along with “Building Burgess.”

In part 3, Burgess is at the Alberta and Northwest Territories Command Service… Continue Reading

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Clearing the Air

By Emily Beers

In Affiliation

July 22, 2014

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Every gym has the occasional body-odor problem. Three CrossFit coaches share their strategies for dealing with a smelly athlete. Emily Beers reports.

Although it was years ago, Andrew Swartz still gags when he thinks about the stench.

“His body odor was different than anything I’d experienced. It didn’t seem to be restricted by the laws of physics as we know them,” the longtime CrossFit coach said of a… Continue Reading

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CrossFit Media video producer Torin Simpson spent five days on James Hobart’s couch in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, to get a feel for what drives the second-place finisher at the North East Regional.

“I learned that there’s a lot more to James Hobart than the competitor you will see at the CrossFit Games,” Simpson says. “In fact, competition is perhaps the least important aspect of his life.”

Family is among the most important.

“I’m very close to… Continue Reading

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